Category: The National Dialogue

julian-muller 0

Different understandings of the meaning of reconciliation (Prof Julian Müller, Deputy Dean, Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria)

I have been invited to respond to the reaction of the majority at a conference in Gauteng, who struggled to link the idea of forgiveness with restitution. As a practical theologian, I am firstly interested in the experiences of people and therefore would like to understand the reasoning behind such a position. This reminds me of a similar situation which...

john-de-gruchy 0

Tutu, the wealth tax, and the humanist imperative * (John de Gruchy, Emeritus Professor, University of Cape Town)

Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s recent statement about a white wealth tax has evoked much discussion in the media.  His comments were part of a speech he gave at the launching of a book entitled The Humanist Imperative in South Africa, the culmination of a two year long research project based at the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study (STIAS).  What Tutu said...

worcester 0

Worcester remembers … and builds hope!

On the National Day of Reconciliation the people of Worcester joined a process of Hope and Reconciliation to remember those who died and those who were injured in the 1996 Christmas Eve Shoprite Centre bombing.  They gathered not only to mourn a difficult past, but to build a hope-filled future.  Recognising that this horrific event was but one of a...

jeremy 0

South Africa – a Window of Opportunity (Jeremy Burnham)

I am a white male, and have been listening to some black people in my country talking about where we are on our journey towards racial companionship.  I do not pretend to speak for them;  I reflect on what I hear and the conclusions to which I am drawn. My impression is that there remains a shrinking window of opportunity...

braam 0

Restitution is not possible before equality – Braam Hanekom coordinator of PASSOP (People Against Suffering, Oppression and Poverty)

If we want justice, we need restitution. However, without equality or the victims obtaining influence, we cannot achieve restitution. In the case of immigrants who have been displaced by xenophobic violence the sad reality is that victims are often forced to forgive or forget as a prerequisite to reintegration. In their cases restitution could make reintegration impossible. Through circumstance they...

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Restitution is essential as a basis for the restoration of justice and peace in South Africa – The Most Rev Stephen Brislin, Catholic Archbishop of Cape Town

Where a wrong has been committed and relationships have broken down, there can be no healing without some restitution. This is basic to forgiveness, reconciliation and normalization of relationships. If there is to be peace and justice, restitution is a basic essential element both for the perpetrator and the victim. In South Africa so many formerly (and presently) advantaged people...

prof-hans 0

The theological basis for restitution within the South African context – Prof Hans Engdahl, Department of Theology and Religion, University of the Western Cape

There are two pitfalls. To think that you can redeem yourself by paying back for damages, to think that you are able to make good what was destroyed or lost To think that God’s forgiveness which is a free gift allows you to walk off as a free man/woman without obligations leading to restitution Reconciliation, leading to restitution, is a...